Serp Scribe Review| Serp Scribe Bonus and Review

Get Serp Scribe here http://vickcartyshow.com/go/serp-scribe/

During my interview with Ben Murray I did a complete indepth Serp Scribe Review

Serp Scribe is a cloud based done for YOU SEO solution

Serp Scribe gives you the best SEO analytics for any keyword

Serp Scribe gets you broken links to create high quality backlinks

Serp Scribe gets you powerful long tail keywords with fantastic analytics again

Serp Scribe get you high PR blogs to leave comments and get quality backlinks for your websites or videos

Serp Scribe comes with a commercial license so you can sell your own SEO Services using this fantastic tool

Get Serp Scribe http://vickcartyshow.com/go/serp-scribe/

Subscribe to my YouTube Channel – https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCbF13lMA9SD8-Av-ZrM_V5w?view_as=subscriber

Other Related Videos

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5pMDeD-vXFM

Serp Scribe Review| Serp Scribe Bonus and Review

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Serp Scribe Review- Serp Scribe Bonus and Review

Get Serp Scribe here http://vickcartyshow.com/go/serp-scribe/

During my interview with Ben Murray I did a complete indepth Serp Scribe Review

Serp Scribe is a cloud based done for YOU SEO solution

Serp Scribe gives you the best SEO analytics for any keyword

Serp Scribe gets you broken links to create high quality backlinks

Serp Scribe gets you powerful long tail keywords with fantastic analytics again

Serp Scribe get you high PR blogs to leave comments and get quality backlinks for your websites or videos

Serp Scribe comes with a commercial license so you can sell your own SEO Services using this fantastic tool

Get Serp Scribe http://vickcartyshow.com/go/serp-scribe/

Subscribe to my YouTube Channel – https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCbF13lMA9SD8-Av-ZrM_V5w?view_as=subscriber

Other Related Videos

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TAHTst1Yzjw

Serp Scribe Review- Serp Scribe Bonus and Review

#serpscribe

#serpscribereview

#serpscribebonus

#serpscribebenmurray

#serpscriberaduhahaha

Serp Scribe Review| Serp Scribe Review and Bonus

Get Serp Scribe here http://vickcartyshow.com/go/serp-scribe/

During my interview with Ben Murray I did a complete indepth Serp Scribe Review

Serp Scribe is a cloud based done for YOU SEO solution

Serp Scribe gives you the best SEO analytics for any keyword

Serp Scribe gets you broken links to create high quality backlinks

Serp Scribe gets you powerful long tail keywords with fantastic analytics again

Serp Scribe get you high PR blogs to leave comments and get quality backlinks for your websites or videos

Serp Scribe comes with a commercial license so you can sell your own SEO Services using this fantastic tool

Get Serp Scribe http://vickcartyshow.com/go/serp-scribe/

Subscribe to my YouTube Channel – https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCbF13lMA9SD8-Av-ZrM_V5w?view_as=subscriber

Other Related Videos

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NfCgHkDdCkY

Serp Scribe Review| Serp Scribe Review and Bonus

#serpscribe

#serpscribereview

#serpscribebonus

#serpscribebenmurray

#serpscriberaduhahaha

PBN Builder Review – PBN Builder Review and Bonus

Get PBN Builder here http://vickcartyshow.com/go/pbn-builder/

During my interview with Joshua Zamura I did a complete PBN Builder review

PBN Builder is a fantastic cloud based software that helps you manage your very own PBN or for your clients

PBN Builder lets you manage multiple private blog network to rank your videos or websites

PBN Builder is available at a small one time offer

PBN Builder helps in ranking videos or websites on complete auto pilot

Get PBN Builder http://vickcartyshow.com/go/pbn-builder/

Subscribe to my YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCbF13lMA9SD8-Av-ZrM_V5w?view_as=subscriber

Other Related Videos

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qliA67wFpOI

PBN Builder Review – PBN Builder Review and Bonus

#PBNBUILDER

#PBNBuilderreview

#PBNBuilderbonus

#PBNbuilderjoshuazamura

PBN Builder Review| PBN Builder Review and Bonus

Get PBN Builder here http://vickcartyshow.com/go/pbn-builder/

During my interview with Joshua Zamura I did a complete PBN Builder review

PBN Builder is a fantastic cloud based software that helps you manage your very own PBN or for your clients

PBN Builder lets you manage multiple private blog network to rank your videos or websites

PBN Builder is available at a small one time offer

PBN Builder helps in ranking videos or websites on complete auto pilot

Get PBN Builder http://vickcartyshow.com/go/pbn-builder/

Subscribe to my YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCbF13lMA9SD8-Av-ZrM_V5w?view_as=subscriber

Other Related Videos

PBN Builder Review| PBN Builder Review and Bonus

#PBNBUILDER

#PBNBuilderreview

#PBNBuilderbonus

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The Perfect Blog Post Length and Publishing Frequency is B?!!$#x – Whiteboard Friday

Posted by randfish

The perfect blog post length or publishing frequency doesn’t actually exist. “Perfect” isn’t universal – your content’s success depends on tons of personalized factors. In today’s Whiteboard Friday, Rand explains why the idea of “perfect” is baloney when it comes to your blog, and lists what you should actually be looking for in a successful publishing strategy.

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the perfect blog post length and frequency

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Video Transcription

Howdy, Moz fans, and welcome to another edition of Whiteboard Friday. This week we’re going to chat about blog posts and, more broadly, content length and publishing frequency.

So these are things where a lot of the posts that you might read, for example, if you were to Google “ideal blog post length” or “ideal publishing frequency” will give you data and information that come from these sources of here’s the average length of content of the top 10 results in Google across a 5,000-keyword set, and you can see that somewhere between 2,350 and 2,425 words is the ideal length, so that’s what you should aim for.

I am going to call a big fat helping if baloney on that. It’s not only dead wrong, it’s really misleading. In fact, I get frustrated when I see these types of charts used to justify this information, because that’s not right at all.

When you see charts/data like this used to provide prescriptive, specific targets for content length, ask:

Any time you see this, if you see a chart or data like this to suggest, hey, this is how long you should make a post because here’s the length of the average thing in the top 10, you should ask very careful questions like:

1. What set of keywords does this apply to? Is this a big, broad set of 5,000 keywords, and some of them are navigational and some of them are informational and some of them are transactional and maybe a few of them are ecommerce keywords and a few of them are travel related and a few of them are in some other sector?

Because honestly, what does that mean? That’s sort of meaningless, right? Especially if the standard deviation is quite high. If we’re talking about like, oh, well many things that actually did rank number one were somewhere between 500 words and 15,000 words. Well, so what does the average tell me? How is that helpful? That’s not actually useful or prescriptive information. In fact, it’s almost misleading to make that prescriptive.

2. Do the keywords that I care about, the ones that I’m targeting, do they have similar results? Does the chart look the same? If you were to take a sample of let’s say 50 keywords that you cared about and you were to get the average content length of the top 10 results, would it resemble that? Would it not? Does it have a high standard deviation? Is there a big delta because some keywords require a lot of content to answer them fully and some keywords require very, very small amounts of content and Google has prioritized accordingly? Is it wise, then, to aim for the average when a much larger article would be much more appreciated and be much more likely to succeed, or a much shorter one would do far better? Why are you aiming for this average if that’s the case?

3. Is correlation the same as causation? The answer is hell no. Never has been. Big fat no. Correlation doesn’t even necessarily imply causation. In fact, I would say that any time you’re looking at an average, especially on this type of stuff, correlation and causation are totally separate. It is not because the number one result is 2,450 words that it happens to rank number one. Google does not work that way. Never has, never will.

INSTEAD of trusting these big, unknown keyword set averages, you should:

A. look at your keywords and your search results and what’s working versus not in those specific ones.

B. Be willing to innovate, be willing to say, “Hey, you know what? I see this content today, the number one, number two, number three rankings are in these sorts of averages. But I actually think you can answer this with much shorter content and many searchers would appreciate it.” I think these folks, who are currently ranking, are over-content creating, and they don’t need to be.

C. You should match your goals and your content goals with searcher goals. That’s how you should determine the length that you should put in there. If you are trying to help someone solve a very specific problem and it is an easily answerable question and you’re trying to get the featured snippet, you probably don’t need thousands of words of content. Likewise, if you are trying to solve a very complex query and you have a ton of resources and information that no one else has access to, you’ve done some really unique work, this may be way too short for what you’re aiming for.

All right. Let’s switch over to publishing frequency, where you can probably guess I’m going to give you similar information. A lot of times you’ll see, “How often should I publish? Oh, look, people who publish 11 times or more per month, they get way more traffic than people who publish only once a month. Therefore, clearly, I should publish 11 or more times a month.”

Why is the cutoff at 11? Does that make any sense to you? Are these visits all valuable to all the companies that were part of whatever survey was in here? Did one blog post account for most of the traffic in the 11 plus, and it’s just that the other 10 happened to be posts where they were practicing or trying to get good, and it was just one that kind of shot out of the park there?

See a chart like this? Ask:

1. Who’s in the set of sites analyzed? Are they similar to me? Do they target a similar audience? Are they in my actual sector? What’s the relative quality of the content? How savvy and targeted are the efforts at earning traffic? Is this guy over here, are we sure that all 11 posts were just as good as the one post this person created? Because if not, I’m comparing apples and oranges.

2. What’s the quality of the traffic? What’s the value of the traffic? Maybe this person is getting a ton of really valuable traffic, and this person over here is getting very little. You can’t tell from a chart like this, especially when it’s averaged in this way.

3. What things might matter more than raw frequency?

  • Well, matching your goals to your content schedule. If one of your goals is to build up subscribers, like Whiteboard Friday where people know it and they’ve heard of it, they have a brand association with it, it’s called Whiteboard Friday, it should probably come out once a week on Friday. There’s a frequency implied in the content, and that makes sense. But you might have goals that only demand publishing once a quarter or once a month or once a week or once every day. That’s okay. But you should tie those together.
  • Consistency, we have found, is almost always more important than raw frequency, especially if you’re trying to build up that consistent audience and a subscriber base. So I would focus on that, not how I should publish more often, but I should publish more consistently so that people will get used to my publishing schedule and will look forward to what I have to say, and also so that you can build up a cadence for yourself and your organization.
  • Crafting posts that actually earn attention and amplification and help your conversion funnel goals, whatever those might be, over raw traffic. It’s far better if this person got 50 new visits who turned into 5 new paying customers, than this person who published 11 posts and got 1 new paying customer out of all 11. That’s a lot more work and expense for a lot less ROI. I’d be careful about that.

*ASIDE:

One aside I would say about publishing frequency. If you’re early stage, or if you were trying to build a career in blogging or in publishing, it’s great to publish a lot of content. Great writers become great because they write a lot of terrible crap, and then they improve. The same is true with web publishers.

If you look at Whiteboard Friday number one, or a blog post number one from me, you’re going to see pretty miserable stuff. But over time, by publishing quite a bit, I got better at it. So if that is your goal, yes, publishing a lot of content, more than you probably need, more than your customers or audience probably needs, is good practice for you, and it will help you get better.

All right, everyone. Hope you’ve enjoyed this edition of Whiteboard Friday. We’ll see you again next week. Take care.

Video transcription by Speechpad.com

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5 Tips to Help Show ROI from Local SEO

Posted by JoyHawkins

Earlier this year, when I was first writing my advanced local SEO training, I reached out to some users who work for local SEO agencies and asked them what they’d like more training on. The biggest topic I got as a result was related to tracking and reporting value to small business owners.

My clients will often forward me reports from their prior SEO company, expressing that they have no idea what they were getting for their money. Some of the most common complaints I see with these reports are:

  • Too much use of marketing lingo (“Bounce Rate,” “CTR,” etc.)
  • Way too much data
  • No representation of what impact the work done had on the business itself (did it get them more customers?)

If a small business owner is giving you hundreds or thousands of dollars every month, how do you prove to them they’re getting value from it? There’s a lot to dig into with this topic – I included a full six pages on it in my training. Today I wanted to share some of the most successful tips that I use with my own clients.


1. Stop sending automated Google Analytics reports

If the goal is to show the customer what they’re getting from their investment, you probably won’t achieve it by simply sending them an Analytics report each month. Google Analytics is a powerful tool, but it only looks awesome to you because you’re a marketer. Over the past year, I’ve looked at many monthly reports that made my head spin – it’s just too much data. The average SMB isn’t going to be able to look at those reports and figure out how their bounce rate decreasing somehow means you’re doing a great job at SEO.

2. Make conversions the focus of your report

What does the business owner care about? Hint: it’s not how you increased the ranking for one of their 50 tracked keywords this month. No, what they care about is how much additional business you drove to their business. This should be the focus of the report you send them. Small business call conversions

3. Use dynamic number insertion to track calls

If you’re not already doing this, you’re really killing your ability to show value. I don’t have a single SEO or SEM client that isn’t using call tracking. I use Call Tracking Metrics, but CallRail is another one that works well, too. This allows you to see the sources of incoming calls. Unlike slapping a call tracking number on your website, dynamic number insertion won’t mess up NAP consistency.

The bonus here is that you can set up these calls as goals in Google Analytics. Using the Landing Page report, you can see which pages on the site were responsible for getting that call. Instead of saying, “Hey customer, a few months ago I created this awesome page of content for you,” you can say “Hey customer, a few months ago, I added this page to your site and as a result, it’s got you 5 more calls.”

Conversion goal completion in Google Analytics

4. Estimate revenue

I remember sitting in a session a couple years ago when Dev Basu from Powered by Search told me about this tactic. I had a lightbulb moment, wondering why the heck I didn’t think to do this before.

The concept is simple: Ask the client what the average lifetime value of their customer is. Next, ask them what their average closing ratio is on Internet leads. Take those numbers and, based on the number of conversions, you can calculate their estimated revenue.

Formula: Lifetime Value of a Customer x Closing Ratio (%) x Number of Conversions = Estimated Revenue

Bonus tip: Take this a step further and show them that for every dollar they pay you, you make them $X. Obviously, if the lifetime value of the customer is high, these numbers look a lot better. For example, an attorney could look like this:Example monthly ROI for an attorneyWhereas an insurance agent would look like this:

Example monthly ROI for an insurance agent

5. Show before/after screenshots, not a ranking tracker.

I seriously love ranking trackers. I spend a ton of time every week looking at reports in Bright Local for my clients. However, I really believe ranking trackers are best used for marketers, not business owners. How many times have you had a client call you freaking out because they noticed a drop in ranking for one keyword? I chose to help stop this trend by not including ranking reports in my monthly reporting and have never regretted that decision.

Instead, if I want to highlight a significant ranking increase that happened as a result of SEO, I can do that by showing the business owner a visual – something they will actually understand. This is where I use Bright Local’s screenshots; I can see historically how a SERP used to look versus how it looks now.


At the end of the day, to show ROI you need to think like a business owner, not a marketer. If your goals match the goals of the business owner (which is usually to increase calls), make sure that’s what you’re conveying in your monthly reporting.

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